Course Schedule and Information

Spring 2018 Quarter

Enrollment for the upcoming quarter is now open!

Course Number
Course Title
Date
Time
Delivery Format
Instructor
Required/Elective
URBN PL XLC 216Food Studies Graduate Certificate ColloquiumTuesdays
Apr 03, 2018 to Jun 12, 2018
2:00pm – 4:00pmClassroomRoberts, M.T.
Tomiyama, A.J.
Required
ANTHRO XL 133FAnthropology of FoodApr 02, 2018 to Jun 17, 2018OnlineOnlineLesley DaspitElective
PHYSCI X 451Introduction to Human NutritionThursdays
Apr 05, 2018 to Jun 14, 2018
7:00pm – 10:00pmClassroomSusan C. KimElective
PUB PLC X 477Food JusticeApr 02, 2018 to Jun 17, 2018OnlineOnlineJames BassettElective

Course Descriptions

URBN PL XLC 216 - Food Studies Graduate Certificate Colloquium

Units: 4

Delivery Format: Classroom

Food is complex subject given that production, procurement, preparation, consumption, and exchange of edible matter is biologically vital to human growth, development, and function and critical to many aspects of society and culture. Food studies is growing cross-disciplinary field of research, teaching, and advocacy that encompasses and draws from cultural anthropology and geography, food law and policy, urban planning, sociology, literature, history, public health, nutrition, environmental science, molecular and cell biology, science and technology studies (STS), agronomy, and other disciplines. Survey of some of these wide-ranging topics and disciplines that define food studies. Transferable for UC credit.

ANTHRO XL 133F - Anthropology of Food

Units: 4

Delivery Format: Online

This course covers the production, consumption, and distribution of food, with particular emphasis on culture of food. Explore the ecological history, class, poverty, hunger, ethnicity, nationalism, capitalism, gender, race, and sexuality of food and how it shapes identities, desires, and needs in our contemporary world. Transferable for UC credit.

PHYSCI X 451 - Introduction to Human Nutrition

Units: 4

Delivery Format: Classroom and Online

This course provides students with a background in the basics of nutrition and stresses the link between nutrition practices, health, disease, and exercise performance. Topics include macronutrient needs; vitamins, minerals, and other supplements; energy balance; weight control; the effects of nutrient excesses and deficiencies on performance; ergogenic aids; eating disorders; and how to recognize nutrition practices that may require professional referral. Students also gain practical knowledge through understanding nutrition labeling and evaluating literature.

PUB PLC X 477 - Food Justice

Units: 4

Delivery Format: Online

This course examines food justice from diverse theoretical, applied and ethical perspectives (e.g., socioeconomic class, race and ethnicity, culture, access and equity, law, economy, ecology, sovereignty, health and wellbeing). We will survey food justice organizations and initiatives working to create and maintain healthy and sustainable food systems locally, regionally and globally. The course explores the contemporary food system by examining food production, distribution, and consumption and their impacts on the quality of life of food producers, workers and consumers. The course will provide a framework for understanding and addressing issues of food justice; specifically, the role of policy and politics in determining what we eat, who experiences the costs and benefits of contemporary/industrial food systems, and how we can build equity and sustainability for our food system. Upon completion of the course, students will have a working understanding of established and emerging approaches to the challenges of improving and promoting food justice. Students will also gain the practical knowledge needed to advocate effectively for food justice.

PUB PLC X 478 - Sustainable Food and Agriculture

Units: 4

Delivery Format: Online

This course examines the concepts, practices, and policies of sustainable food and agriculture. Students begin by surveying the environmental, economic, and social foundations of the field in the U.S. and globally. Topics include a systems approach to sustainable agriculture; the relationship of farming to water, energy, air, and soil; field crops and animal production practices in sustainable agriculture; sustainable horticulture; organic agriculture; sustainable seafood and aquaculture; economic, social, and political context of sustainable food and agriculture; and sustainability in the culinary arts. The course also considers the impacts of agricultural industrialization and potential opportunities for the future of sustainable agriculture, including identifying practical tools, measuring performance, and reviewing best practices. Guest speakers and field trips are scheduled in the public and private sectors.